New perspective, old problems

As a personal rule I don’t allow myself to use elevators unless I actually need them because I am either injured or have to carry so much stuff that using the stairs is not logical.

Well, last Thursday I tore the cartilage in in the top of my foot and have been on crutches and in a walking boot for the last week plus. While this has its advantages, excused time off work and a temporary VIP parking pass for campus (handicapped tag), it has also been a nuisance.

Two things I have noticed while in my situation that I probably wouldn’t have without the injury are the what seems like a lack of handicapped parking and the overwhelming number of people who use elevators without any real reason (that I could tell from looking at them) other than that they don’t want to walk up five flights of stairs at most, five flights.

The first problem is completely out the student’s hands, they have no control over how many spots are available; the most I have seen is four spots for one building. I am going to assume that ETSU has the proper ratio of spots for the total number of parking spots on campus but it just feels as if there should be more. Twice I had to park in Buc Sports parking because drivers who had the right to be there took the two reserved spots for Warf-Pickel. Wouldn’t it make sense for ETSU to supply more than the required number of these spaces? After walking a mile in the shoes, or walking boot, of those people I would prefer to lose another 15-20 regular spots in order to make sure the people who truly need to be close to their class have that option.

Now, the second problem is one that irks me more than most things and always did before I hurt my foot but has become more irritating over the last week. Three times over the course of the week I had to wait for the elevator to come back around because it was full when it originally stopped on my floor, full of what appeared to be perfectly healthy, young, energetic students. I’d be willing to bet that I didn’t see anyone over the age of 30 in those full elevators.

Giving the benefit of the doubt here I will say possibly one person in each of those occasions needed to be using the elevator, the others not so much. Why then? It’s not faster, on numerous occasions before I was injured I would see people waiting on the elevator as I entered the staircase usually I was already be in class when they came in.

Stop being lazy, ETSU. Walking up and down a couple flights of stairs each day is a good thing. If nothing else it’s a little exercise, which we could all use. How about from now on we only use the elevators for what they were intended, not as an excuse or cop-out to a little physical activity. The little everyday stuff is what keeps us healthy, so put forth the extra effort, if not for your own health than for the people who the accommodations were actually made to help. Stop being jealous and think about the girl with a broken foot or that guy whose carrying 18 things up to the fifth floor for his final presentation of the semester. They need the elevators, you on the other hand do not. Of course, if you keep using them, eventually you may not be able to physically carry yourself up a single flight of stairs anyway.

-Aaron

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3 thoughts on “New perspective, old problems

  1. Mary Dykes says:

    I must use an elevator as I do have a disability, whether I am using my obvious walker or not. Some disabilities are not seen. Not once have I ever had to wait in line for an elevator. Those elevators are not specific to just people with disabilities or special needs and I have never complained that someone else was using them that did not have an obvious disability. There are no signs whatsoever at all that state the elevators are for use only for those with a handicap. Even if we have to wait, it is for a short while. But, sorry, coming from a person who has need of accomodations, the elevators are not just for people like me alone.

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